Archives for posts with tag: Indoor plants

I often refer to the age of my orchids by guesswork, so today I actually went back to August 2012 when I started writing ‘The Snakeblog’ and checked when I actually received them. I was given the pink orchid nine years ago and it was already a couple of years old I reckon. I bought the original ‘Flare Spots’ seven years ago, the twin miniature phals were a gift three years ago and the other miniature again a gift, three years ago too.
The first keiki which was from ‘Flare Spots’ is also three years old, and the second keiki became independent this year.
On the whole the plants are quite healthy although the ‘twin’ miniatures have struggled somewhat after their re-potting, I do not think they were completely healthy though from day one. However I will persevere to try to bring them up to scratch. I have kept the regime for all these years using the same techniques throughout the seasons and years, just repotting them in fresh potting medium when they show signs of being unhappy.

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The ‘twin’ miniature phals have been looking a bit tired in recent months, and only one of them has flowered this year, so I thought it was worth re-potting them with fresh bark medium, in larger pots.
Already one of them has a new healthy green leaf and I’m hoping that this strategy will save them. I have also dispensed with the outer ceramic pots and left them just with the clear plastic inner pots, to get maximum light to the roots in this transitional phase.
The other miniature phal with a well-developed keiki has now got three roots and when they are slightly longer it will be time for me to give the plantlet a life of its own by cutting it free and planting it in a new pot.
The other orchids are still flowering and producing healthy foliage, the oldest (pink) will be ten years old next year and has both old flowers and a new flower spike too, at present.
It will soon be time to repot this one, after it has finished flowering this time and it will be necessary to use a nine inch pot, quite a bit of growth and several re-pottings since my wife bought it for me.

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Some flowers are starting to fade now, though there is still a mass of blooms.
The miniature phalaenopsis with the keiki now has a new flower spike along with its group of flowers. There are plenty of healthy green leaves on all of the plants too.
One of the ‘twin’ miniatures now has a well developed flower spike, whilst the other has as yet not shown any signs of flowering, however, this one is often later than the others.

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This month sees the appearance of what may be a keiki on the single miniature orchid.

This phalaenopsis orchid grows small leaves all the way up flower spikes anyway, – so it may turn out to be just a new flower spike, surrounded by small leaves – watch this space?

Most of my orchids are in flower now with the exception of the ‘twin’ miniatures who are taking a well earned rest.

 

How time flies!
It is nearly the end of September and my phalaenopsis orchids are nearly all flowering again.

The only two not in flower are the ‘twins’ and they have not produced a flower spike as yet. You may remember that their flowers look like this in stereo.

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Twin miniatures.

Looking at the other flowers above:-
From top left the first is a faded flower on a plant which has just produced two new flower spikes, the second is one of these new flowers.
The next spike of flowers is on the single miniature, which has just started a new spike too.
Number four is on the oldest plant which is massive now and has a flower spike with three flowering branches.
Five and six are ‘Flare Spots’ and its ex-keiki, the flowers are more or less the same size on both.

During the resting period since June I have not changed the growth conditions whatsoever and spend the same half hour per week on all seven orchid plants.

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I have been growing phalaenopsis orchids for around ten years now and the one shown above is a mature plant of the variety ‘Flare Spots’.
This plant had a keiki (plantlet) which I removed and repotted and is now flowering itself.
I have seven orchid plants which flower almost continuously, though they are in a regeneration mode at the moment, and although many have flower spikes only three are in flower at the moment.
I thought it would be useful to go over my growth conditions once again for those who are new to my blog, and especially for beginners.
At the present time the orchids are grown in a shower room which gives it some humidity and also the preferred filtered light, provided by the obscured glass windows.
For most of the time I just enjoy the beauty of the plants but once a week I do my orchid care regime as follows:-
1. The day before I fill a plant waterer with rainwater from the butt, in order to let it equilibrate to room temperature.
2. On regime day I pour some rainwater through the orchid roots inside the pot to wash them.
3. I spray the aerial roots with more rainwater at room temperature. (Do not cut off the aerial roots).

4. I mix the remaining rainwater well (about 500 mls) with 8 drops of orchid food.
5. I give each of the orchids some of this liquid feed.
6. I feed the leaves with an orchid leaf spray.
7. Using secateurs (sterilised with boiling water) I cut off any dead leaves or dead stems.

This regime takes between 20 minutes and half and hour per week for seven plants and produces pretty good orchids.

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With this orchid blog it is and always has been my intention to prove to people that phalaenopsis orchid growing can be relatively straightforward, easy even – and need only take up 30 minutes of your valuable time each week.
All you need is a good supply of rainwater, a place to grow them out of direct sunlight, an orchid liquid feed and a foliar feed, (these both last for quite a long time), – the liquid feed is diluted eight drops in around 500 mls of rainwater each time.

Here we are in late July and although there are few flowers left, the foliage is exceptionally green and there are a total of seven flower spikes already appearing. In fact the only two plants not developing flowers as yet are the two miniature ‘twins’ which are busy producing new leaves at the moment. The ex keiki from the ‘flare-spots’ orchid for instance has two new spikes, as does the newest orchid which still has two mature flowers in addition.
I hope that this small blog will encourage some new growers to take part in what has proven to be for me, a very rewarding pastime.