Archives for posts with tag: Orchid growing


The orchids are still growing well and I already have six new flower spikes,- only three plants have not yet started to produce flowers. The oldest orchid has two new spikes and one flower is already out (large flower shown).
My orchids have a quick turn over of flowers and it is quite rare to see them without any.
The other pictures shown are from the new Phalaenopsis orchid display at The Eden Project’s Tropical Biome, where they can be seen growing wild in their natural conditions.

http://www.robinsonart.co.uk

http://www.artgallerysw.co.uk

.

Advertisements


Considering the weather that we have had up to now this year my orchids have fared quite well. I have recently re-potted one of the larger phalaenopsis orchids (the one on the right of the group). I have shown this one as a separate picture. Strangely this is the only one with a flower at present.
The ‘twin’ miniature phal is still growing very slowly but I have upped its moisture intake by carefully spraying the surface media every day to see if it improves.

 

IMG_3205 - Copy

The orchids are losing flowers at this stage of their life. The plants are still healthy,  however, though some are coming up to a re-potting.
The one ‘twin’ miniature phalaenopsis has still not flowered and seems to be on a ‘go slow’ although there are signs of a new leaf developing.

I still have all 8 plants!

I have not changed their regime and still give them a ‘wash out’ once a week with rain water followed by spraying aerial roots again with rain water.

I then give them a few mls of rain water to which I have added orchid food, and spray the leaves with a good leaf food.

(Actual amounts are in an earlier blog).

Hope all your orchids are blooming well. Have a good summer!

David.

http://www.robinsonart.co.uk

http://www.artgallerysw.co.uk

We have had a visit from ‘The Beast from the East’. The orchids are very lucky as they are in the warmest room in the house!

There is a good show of blooms as you can see, and there is still only one not showing any signs of flowering, so I shall have to put a little more time into trying to get this one to flower again.
It may be time soon to give some of them some new growth medium, although it is not always necessary to change the size of pot.
Hope you are enjoying success with your growing and having ideal weather – the present spell is of course good for skiing,sledging,snowboarding,snowballing and building snowmen and igloos!
It helps to stay positive.

In a clockwise direction starting from the left we have the original orchid whose flowers are getting quite old, although a new bud can be seen on the right. The ‘Flare Spots’ keiki is next with its new flowers, next is the original ‘Flare Spots’, followed by the single miniature keiki. The single miniature is next and the twin miniature with the other full size phal in the last place. The only orchid still not ready for flowering is the other twin which has healthy well-developed leaves but no flower spikes as yet.

My growing conditions are still exactly the same, and I am confident that the eighth orchid will soon be flowering again.

img_2591
Everything looks pretty healthy, although a couple of plants are coming up for re-potting. The only surprising thing (which can clearly be seen on the photo) is the fact that one of the ‘twins’ is still refusing to flower in spite of looking ok otherwise. I am sure it will start to flower again pretty soon however.

The original ‘Flare Spots’ on the left has a healthy flower spike which will soon be in bloom.

http://www.robinsonart.co.uk


I thought it may be a good idea to reiterate some earlier stuff on orchid growing as I believe that many beginners think that orchids grow in a similar way to other house plants, this is a misconception and will undoubtedly lead to problems growing these unusual plants.
The first picture shows a phalaenopsis orchid growing in its natural habitat and the second growing in my bathroom. Aerial roots can clearly be seen on the first photograph where the orchid is growing on a tree branch in the tropical biosphere at The Eden Project.

My orchid is growing in a bark medium which simulates the bark of the tree, which they grow on in the wild. On the right of picture 2 is a flower spike in bud and on the left a keiki or plantlet with its own flower spike. Eventually this plantlet will grow aerial roots and become a separate plant.

Orchids are parasitic and derive some of their water and nutrients from the host plant, which is why you need to simulate these conditions carefully in order to grow them successfully.