Archives for posts with tag: Phalaenopsis orchids

Although we are officially in winter and coming to the end of February, we have had some lovely warm springlike days.

I have finally seen some new leaves on the twin miniature orchid which I didn’t give up on.

In  time I’m sure it will be flowering as well as its twin. All the others are flowering again now and are looking quite healthy. My regime has not changed in any way and still takes about 30 minutes a week for the whole group of plants.

  1. spray all the outside aerial roots with rainwater.
  2. flush each pot with rainwater.
  3. add eight drops of orchid food ( baby bio) to one pint of rainwater, mix thoroughly.
  4. give each plant a liberal watering with the mixture.
  5. spray every leaf with Orchid Myst nutrient solution which is a growth enhancer, pest repellant, plant tonic and leaf conditioner, all in one.

Enjoy growing your orchids (mine are all phalaenopsis).

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 New year again – already.
I am still managing to keep the same orchids growing and the good news is that the one ‘twin’ miniature orchid is growing much more healthily and has three small leaves but no flowers as yet. I am now quite confident that it will produce flowers – maybe this year!
There are flower spikes at various stages of development on all seven of the others.
The quality of the plants (some over 10 years old) can clearly be seen, and this has been achieved by following the same growing conditions since I started.
Two of the plants are keikis removed from one miniature and one regular phalaenopsis orchid plant.


The orchids are still growing well and I already have six new flower spikes,- only three plants have not yet started to produce flowers. The oldest orchid has two new spikes and one flower is already out (large flower shown).
My orchids have a quick turn over of flowers and it is quite rare to see them without any.
The other pictures shown are from the new Phalaenopsis orchid display at The Eden Project’s Tropical Biome, where they can be seen growing wild in their natural conditions.

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As you can see from the picture there is a total of seven flowers now and they are on just two plants. The oldest plant has already sent out a new flower spike, a few are about to lose leaves and the slow-growing ‘twin’ does not seem to be thriving, although I have not given up yet.

The third really large plant which I received from a neighbour, (on the right of the sink) still has two flowers, when they have gone I will re-pot the plant in a slightly larger pot.

Apart from this I will continue the same regime as always with a slight difference,- I may immerse the suffering ‘twin’ in a container of rainwater for half an hour  once a week, on a Wednesday, between my usual Saturday water and feed.

 

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The orchids are losing flowers at this stage of their life. The plants are still healthy,  however, though some are coming up to a re-potting.
The one ‘twin’ miniature phalaenopsis has still not flowered and seems to be on a ‘go slow’ although there are signs of a new leaf developing.

I still have all 8 plants!

I have not changed their regime and still give them a ‘wash out’ once a week with rain water followed by spraying aerial roots again with rain water.

I then give them a few mls of rain water to which I have added orchid food, and spray the leaves with a good leaf food.

(Actual amounts are in an earlier blog).

Hope all your orchids are blooming well. Have a good summer!

David.

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At the start of May this year many of my phals are starting to lose flowers and the one ‘slow’ miniature orchid (one of the twins), still isn’t showing signs of growing leaves or flowers, it seems to be in a totally dormant state although the leave are green and not showing any signs of disease?
The picture is of the keiki removed from the ‘single miniature’ I think that you will agree that it is now a well established and attractive plant.
I have never had such a profusion of blooms, with all but one of my eight orchids putting on an unparalleled show of colour and beauty.

In a clockwise direction starting from the left we have the original orchid whose flowers are getting quite old, although a new bud can be seen on the right. The ‘Flare Spots’ keiki is next with its new flowers, next is the original ‘Flare Spots’, followed by the single miniature keiki. The single miniature is next and the twin miniature with the other full size phal in the last place. The only orchid still not ready for flowering is the other twin which has healthy well-developed leaves but no flower spikes as yet.

My growing conditions are still exactly the same, and I am confident that the eighth orchid will soon be flowering again.